Tag: bible

Rightfully righteous

Rightfully righteous

Luke 18:9-14

I am going to make a confession. I was a boring child. Out of all my siblings and friends I was the boring one because I was a rule keeper. Even now as an adult, I love rules and lists and being organised. The Pharisee in this passage seems to be the same. He didn’t steal, cheat or commit adultery, he prayed, fasted and gave one tenth of his earnings as required. Outwardly, he seemed like the perfect person.

Then we have the tax collector. Known to cheat and lie to people, he recognised his faults and sins and asked God to have mercy on him. When they went home, the Pharisee was kept doing the right thing, but didn’t get right with God, but the tax collector opened up to God about his faults and wrong doings and he was right with God – rightfully righteous.

It can be so easy to get carried away doing the right things and looking like the perfect Christian from the outside. But we cannot be rightfully righteous without accepting our faults and opening up to God, asking for His grace and mercy, just like the tax collector.

No one else can judge this because they can’t see what is going on inside. That is down to you to work out with God, and ask for someone to help you work through it if you need or want to open up and get someone else involved.

When Jesus comes again

When Jesus comes again

Study of Luke 17:24-37

In this passage found in Luke 17, Jesus is telling His followers of what to expect when He comes back again. We know that they would not have experienced His second coming as we are yet to experience it, but we know that Jesus did not even know when this would be. He did know that we would be reading this though so perhaps it was intended more for those of us who read this in the Bible than for those who wrote it down in the first place.

  1. What signs are mentioned in the passage that will tell us Jesus is coming?
  2. Can you remember/ find another incidence that Jesus or God shone like lightening like He is depicted to do in His second coming?
  3. Why is this time also described like the events surrounding Noah and Lot?
  4. Verse 33 reads, ‘Those who try to keep their lives will lose them. But those who give up their lives will save them.’ What does this mean?
  5. When the people around who heard Jesus say all this they asked Him where it will happen. Jesus answered, “Where there is a dead body, there the vultures will gather.” What does He mean?
The Richman and Lazarus

The Richman and Lazarus

Luke 16:19-31

When I am attempting to learn something new, I have to be physically involved. You could give me pictures or say the instructions step by step. I could even watch you do something and have a video recording of it to watch back, but if I don’t get the opportunity to be hands on, I won’t remember it nor will I be able to confidently carry out a task.

In the story Jesus told about the rich man and Lazarus, it seems the rich man was like me. He had teaching from Moses and the prophets, but he only paid attention and fully understood it when it was too late.

I know some people who take advice from others and put it straight into practice and others who ignore advice from anyone other than themselves. I am somewhere in the middle. I appreciate good advice when I need it, but will need to test it before taking it as solid truth. For example, if someone told me that something was hot, I would often have to hold my hand near it before believing them. – not on it though because I am not a risk taker!

With Lazarus in heaven and the rich man in hell, he suddenly realises that he is wrong but it is too late. Jesus explains that once you are in heaven or hell, you cannot switch over to the other. One belongs to the devil and the other belongs to God – no house shares allowed!

This is difficult to hear as Christians with friends who are not believers, but it is the way things work. Good and evil are separated and there can be no contamination otherwise Heaven could not be the perfect place we know it to be. We need to be sharing the Good News of Jesus with everyone we know and love to ensure they don’t end up in the fires of hell. However, we are lucky that in our time, since Jesus’ death and resurrection, we are given another chance. Judgement day is God’s day for Him to ask us one more time if we believe in Him. Therefore, even if we decide to go against Him all our lives, we have another chance to spend eternity in Heaven.

Our God is a compassionate, loving, gracious, merciful God. He is the God who sent His only Son to earth to die for us – He wouldn’t do that if He didn’t care about us. God doesn’t want us to leave Him and spend eternity away from Him so He will always give us the best chance, but if you have the opportunity, say yes to God now – it will save time later.

The cost of being Jesus’ follower

The cost of being Jesus’ follower

‘Large crowds were traveling with Jesus, and he turned and said to them, “If anyone comes to me but loves his father, mother, wife, children, brothers, or sisters—or even life—more than me, he cannot be my follower. Whoever is not willing to carry his cross and follow me cannot be my follower. If you want to build a tower, you first sit down and decide how much it will cost, to see if you have enough money to finish the job. If you don’t, you might lay the foundation, but you would not be able to finish. Then all who would see it would make fun of you, saying, ‘This person began to build but was not able to finish.’ “If a king is going to fight another king, first he will sit down and plan. He will decide if he and his ten thousand soldiers can defeat the other king who has twenty thousand soldiers. If he can’t, then while the other king is still far away, he will send some people to speak to him and ask for peace. In the same way, you must give up everything you have to be my follower.‘ – Luke 14:25-33

Life has its challenges but overall, I love it! I love spending time with my family and seeing friends, reading books, watching films, walking the dogs, eating nice foods, good music, doing arts and crafts, playing guitar and singing, ice skating, and much more! When I wake up in the morning, even on a bad day, I look forward to what I am going to do. Sometimes, that is walking the dogs and seeing friends and sometimes it is reading and lots of sleep. Whatever it is, I do my best to have a good day and make it one for others too!

We have been given the gift of life to enjoy so it is not wrong to love life, but as Jesus says in Luke 14, it is wrong to love it above God. When we get so stuck into the things we love that we forget God and even idolise those activities, then we are living life the wrong way. “In the same way, you must give up everything you have to be my follower”. This doesn’t mean you can still love life and the things you enjoy, but it is important to recognise the reason we have these things is God’s gift of life, love and provision and without Him. When you are doing something you love, take a moment to remember the One who made it possible and thank Him for it.

You will be rewarded

You will be rewarded

Study of Luke 14:12-14

In this passage, we find Jesus telling yet another parable to the man who He had attended dinner with. You will see when you read the whole chapter, that both the passage before and the one after are both parables and each of them are related to dinners and banquets also. He must have been hungry when He was telling these stories to have had food on brain each time!

  1. Why does Jesus talk use parables of eating and banquets so often in His teaching?
  2. Who was this teaching intended for?
  3. Why does Jesus tell the man to not only invite His rich friends and family but also the poor and crippled, lame and blind to the banquet?
  4. What does Jesus mean when He says, “But you will be repaid when the good people rise from the dead”?
  5. How can we use this parable to help us be more Christ-like in our lives?
Jesus will die in Jerusalem

Jesus will die in Jerusalem

Study of Luke 13:31-35

We are very far away now from the lovely Christmas story that is usually told at this time of year. We are deep into the mud and mire of Jesus’ life and the sadness and darkness is building. The baby, kings, sheep and cosy stable are far away but this is the reality of Jesus’ life and our lives too. Christmas is great, but it doesn’t last forever. We have work to do and it won’t be happy, jolly, fun all the time – sometimes, it requires sacrifice and pain too.

  1. In previous passages, the Pharisees have tried to trick or even endanger Jesus. Why are they warning Him about Herod now?
  2. Why does Jesus refer to Herod as a fox?
  3. What is the importance of Jerusalem here? Why does Jesus say He cannot be killed outside of Jerusalem?
  4. Who was Jesus greatest enemy at this point? Herod? The religious leaders? The general public?
  5. Does Jesus let the adversity affect Him or what He decides to do going forward?
Change your hearts

Change your hearts

Luke 13:1-5

Despite the simplicity of this title, this passage contains a lot to think about! Firstly, Luke tells us about some people who died, some at the hands of Pilate and others when a tower fell and crushed them. He goes on to tell us what Jesus said about these situations:

“Do you think this happened to them because they were more sinful than all others from Galilee? No, I tell you. But unless you change your hearts and lives, you will be destroyed as they were!” – Luke 13:2b-3

The purpose of Jesus bringing up these situations was to explain to the people listening that those who died here had no part in this. They hadn’t done anything wrong or chosen to be in these situations, yet they lost their lives. This is a great comfort to us today that when tragedies occur, it is not always the fault of the people involved, or anyone else for that matter. Hurricanes, tsunamis, volcano eruptions, falling towers, death at the hands of others. In all these cases, the people who die are not to be blamed.

When I first became ill, I was told by many people that I needed to pray more, have more faith of a repent of a sin. They told me it was my fault I was ill, otherwise God would have healed me by now, but that is just not true. Sometimes, these things happen, and there’s nothing we can do about it. Not everything is out of our control though.

Although Jesus made it clear that these people did not die due to their actions, or lack of, the same could happen to us at any moment. No day, hour, minute or second of life is guaranteed and we need to prepare for the day we are not on the earth anymore – that means we need to check out and change our hearts.

Yesterday, we read the parable of the servants who are awaiting their master. They don’t know when he is coming, but they are prepared for his arrival. In the same way, we need to prepare for Jesus’ arrival, even though we don’t know exactly when it will happen.

Take a moment to look at your heart. What parts need some cleaning or removing and what parts need some work doing? What could you do today to help you prepare for the day when your heart will be visible to God in Heaven?

Don’t trust in earthly things

Don’t trust in earthly things

Luke 12:32-34

I think there are two groups of people in the world. One group spend their money as soon as they get it and the other group saves as much money as possible, only spending what is necessary. Which one are you? I am a mixture of the two, but I prioritise saving money over spending it on ‘things’.

As you might have noticed, there is often a thread that goes through a few passages in a row or an entire chapter. In this particular one, the message seems to be about not treasuring earthly possessions above God and heavenly things. Although being good at saving money is generally positive on earth (as long as you aren’t greedy!), saving isn’t looked down so well upon in Heaven.

There is a very well known story that you may be familiar with that represents the importance of putting God first. It is the camel and the needle and it can be found in Luke 18:25:
“It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God”.

It is not wrong for us to have money or clothes or earthly things that we love, as long as we are not greedy or selfish and don’t idolise those things. It only becomes a problem when we prioritse those over God. If saving your money becomes more important to you than giving it away to people in need, that is when you might need to reconsider what your faith means to you. As Jesus said, ” Your heart will be where your treasure is.”

I need to check myself to ensure that when I save money, I am not doing so for selfish reasons, but that I am doing so with the progression of God’s kingdom and my future in Heaven in mind.

Don’t be like the Pharisees

Don’t be like the Pharisees

Study of Luke 12:1-7

It’s busy. So busy that the crowd are standing on each other’s toes. They have gathered to see and hear Jesus and what does He decide to talk to this very large, eager crowd about? Love? Grace? Forgiveness? Nope. He tells them not the be like the Pharisees, who are hypocrites! Not a nice message to hear – especially if you are a Pharisee!

  1. Why do you think Jesus decided to talk about hypocrisy at this moment? Was it because He knew He could reach lots of people with a lesson important to Him? Maybe it was because He knew there were Pharisees in the crowd who would hear the message too? What do you think?
  2. Why does Jesus tell the people to ‘Beware of the yeast of the Pharisees…’ What does He mean by that?
  3. Jesus starts by talking about hypocrisy, then about fearing the devil and finally, about how much God knows about and cares for us – more than the sparrows. Why do you think Jesus combined these stories in one session?
Jesus talks to the experts of the law

Jesus talks to the experts of the law

Study of Luke 11:45-54

As someone leading an online community of Christians (a Church?), this passage in Luke 11:45-54 spoke to me in a big way! Jesus is forced to converse with a group of experts of the law after one of them said they were insulted by what Jesus had been teaching. Jesus was not often on their side, or in favour of what they were teaching the people.

  1. Why do you think the law experts felt insulted by Jesus?
  2. What were they doing that Jesus didn’t like?
  3. Why were the experts of the law enforcing rules on the people but not keeping them themselves? Were they above them? Unaware of them? Did they not really believe they were required to be kept, but wanted control over the people?
  4. When Jesus said, “You have taken away the key to learning about God’, what does He mean?
  5. The passages ends with, ‘When Jesus left, the teachers of the law and the Pharisees began to give him trouble, asking him questions about many things, trying to catch him saying something wrong.’ Why did the experts of the law want to catch Jesus out?