Tag: study

1 Year Review and Looking Forward…

1 Year Review and Looking Forward…

I cannot believe that after creating a Twitter account one year ago, YouBelong would be what it is now and heading in the direction it seems to be!

At the time, my Mum was working in a cafe and as I had a hospital appointment later that day, I decided to go into work with her to wait for my appointment. I can’t remember exactly what was going through my head other than that I had just completed my theology degree and was wondering what the purpose of it was as I was too unwell to use it. Then I was reminded of something my course director had told me about – online church. I didn’t really know what that would look like but knew there must be others like me who were too unwell to attend church some weeks, or maybe even every week, and others who could physically attend church but felt isolated by the complex theology and ‘Chistianese’ used in many churches. I can attend church most weeks, with the help of my parents, but have avoided some churches not because I cannot physically access them or because I can’t understand them, but because their theological teaching around pain, suffering and disability is damaging and hurtful. By giving others a safe place to share their thoughts and concerns around balancing life as a Christian with a life as a disabled or chronically ill person, and discover that God isn’t as harsh and judgmental, or formula abiding, as some places make Him out to be.

I quickly knew this project was going to be bigger than I ever intended or imagined when the number of followers grew. This was confirmed to me whilst at Spring Harvest just before Easter when a number of church leaders told me about people they knew of, within their congregation and in the community, that do not attend their churches due to disabilities or chronic illnesses. It wasn’t that they weren’t wanting to change that, but they didn’t know how.

Meeting leaders led to me being invited to a conference where lots of other church leaders gathered to discuss and help one another run their churches in the best way possible. Although a lot of the teaching was for physical churches, it gave me some ideas but more importantly, it grew my network and has helped raise awareness of people with chronic illness and disability in the Church – or not.

Around March, I started a blog (youbelong2019.wordpress.com) as a place to share my thoughts and experiences in greater detail as social media only allows for limited characters. I was shocked and surprised to find out just a few months after starting the blog that I was a finalist in the Premier Digital Awards! As the Premier Digital Conference preceded the awards show, I decided to attend that first and came away with lots of notes and more connections and I hope to work with these people over the coming year. The day flew past and suddenly YouBelong was being announced as winner of the up and coming blog! It still amazes me now and I am so thankful for all of you who guest blogged and who read the posts each week – thank you!

Before long, December was here and with that, advent. I knew I wanted to arrange something for us to do together as a community and after seeing the idea to study the 24 chapters of Luke in 24 days, that the 24 days before Christmas would be perfectly suited to that. I wanted to ensure that people from all platforms (YouBelong is on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram now) were able to participate so I posted every day on every platform. It was a bigger commitment than I initially realised but I was thankful for having done it as I not only learnt more about the stories in Luke’s gospel but also got to interact with more of you and have since heard stories of couples reading the chapter together each day and some people sharing them with others they know to encourage them which I love to hear!

And know we are into 2020, YouBelong is 1 year old and we have LOADS of exciting plans in place to move things forward in new ways this year. One of the biggest things that we hope and plan to do is register as a charity so that we have access to funding to enable the team to grow, to reach isolated people where they are, provide resources and training for churches and start a more official online church for those who cannot attend church, either at all or occasionally. This will also include a connect group which will begin on Facebook and be a closed group of people who study the same passages/ topic together so if you are interested in getting involved, I highly recommend following us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/youbelong2019 now as this will be launching in the next few weeks!

I am excited for what the year ahead has to bring and hope you are too! If you have any ideas of things you would like to see included then please get in touch either via email at info@youbelong.org.uk or on our social media.

Pilate sends Jesus to Herod

Pilate sends Jesus to Herod

Study of Luke 23:6-12

We are almost at the end of this book now (only 2 chapters left to go!) and things are getting messy! Jesus has been falsely arrested and now the authorities are battling over what to do with this ‘troublemaker’.

  1. Pilate only sends Jesus to Herod in Luke’s account. Why do you think Luke wanted to include this information?
  2. Why was Herod wanting to meet Jesus? How long had he been waiting?
  3. Why did Herod get Jesus dressed up in a robe like a king?
  4. Why do you think that Jesus spoke to Pilate but refused to reply to Herod?
  5. Why was Jesus sent back to Pilate again at the end of the passage?
Peter says he doesn’t know Jesus

Peter says he doesn’t know Jesus

Luke 22:54-62

I am sure you will know this passage already so I am just going to give a quick summary before getting into the questions for today:

Jesus is arrested, Peter follows, people around question Peter about his connection with Jesus, he denies knowing Jesus, once, twice, three times, then the roaster crows and Peter remembers that he told Jesus he would never deny him but Jesus told him he would do so three times before the roaster crowed….. and breathe!

  1. Why is Jesus taken straight to the high priest after being arrested?
  2. Why does Peter deny knowing Jesus?
  3. Why does Peter cry when he denies Jesus for the third time? What is he remembering?
  4. Previously, Jesus used the Greek word agape for love the first two times, while Peter used a different word, phileoAgape carries the meaning of intense, complete, devoted, sacrificial love, while phileo refers to love as in friendship. Why do you think they used different words?
  5. What can we learn from this and apply to our lives today?
Jerusalem will be destroyed

Jerusalem will be destroyed

Study of Luke 21:20-24

The passage prior to this one is a prediction of the end of time and warns us, as Christians, to expect conflict and harm from others. This passage that follows is yet another prediction of times to come but where the previous one ends by telling us faith will save us, this one seems to end as darkly as it begins.

  1. What is different about the way in which Jesus talks about the destruction of Jerusalem here versus in Matthew 24:15-22 and Mark 13:14-20?
  2. At the end of this passage the statement “until the times of the Gentiles” is given – what does this mean?
  3. How do these prophecies of Jesus reinforce your faith in Him?
Is Christ the Son of God?

Is Christ the Son of God?

Study of Luke 20:41-44

In this passage, Jesus is answering a question, perhaps asked by someone or maybe He just knew they would be wondering about it – ‘Why do people say the Christ is the Son of David?’

  1. Who is Jesus talking to in this passage?
  2. Is the question a genuine or rhetorical question? How can we know?
  3. In verse 42, it says ‘The Lord said to my Lord’. Who are these referring to? Are they the same person?
  4. Which enemies of God did David put ‘under God’s control’?
  5. Finally, I am asking the question that Jesus asks in the passage: David calls the Christ ‘Lord,’ so how can the Christ be his son?
The Sadducees try to trick Jesus

The Sadducees try to trick Jesus

Luke 20:27-40

As a young child, my faith was so strong that almost nothing in this world was strong enough to break me away from God. I felt God physically next to me for many years so never felt alone. As I have grown up, that feeling of a physical presence of God has disappeared, not because my faith has gone, but it has changed, as have I, and the the things I worry about have changed too.

In Luke 20:27-40, Jesus is faced with a tricky question about marriage and right relationships – if one man marries a woman, but dies, then she marries another man, but he dies, and another but he dies, until she has married 7 men, when she dies, who is her rightful husband? It is a complicated question, but Jesus answers it perfectly!

Marriage is an earthly event. In heaven, we won’t have husbands and wives because in Heaven, we are all children of God and all love and care for one another. I don’t know if that means we won’t be worried about being with our partners or families, or if we just don’t even remember those events, but it seems it will all be irrelevant in Heaven.

When I was younger, Heaven was Heaven. It was a place I was going to when I died where I would be with God and float around with the angels whilst smiling and singing songs of praise and worship to God. Now I am older, my interpretation of Heaven is different. I don’t think I will be floating around on a cloud and bouncing from one to another whilst unicorns gallop past, but maybe it will!? In this passage in Luke 20, Jesus makes Heaven more real, understandable but also confusing. He knows what it is like to love but we won’t love another as husband and wife as we have done on Earth.

It can be hard to grasp this concept because we want to be with our partners forever, that’s why we get married, but remember, the traditional wedding vows say:

”til death do us part’.

Marriage wasn’t ever intended to go on into Heaven. I don’t know whether when we get there, we won’t remember that we got married, we won’t recognise our partners, or we just won’t be worried about being with them because we have everyone else around us to love too. It’s complicated, and far beyond our human brains can imagine. All I know is that Heaven is going to be amazing! Everyone will love one another and there will be no fears, shame or regret. The perfect place! Whether I get to jump around and float on clouds with the unicorns (like my 8 year old self hoped/ believed) or I just get to be with the rest of God’s children in a big, happy family setting, I can’t wait!

How do you imagine Heaven to be and what are you most looking forward to?

Jesus enters Jerusalem as King

Jesus enters Jerusalem as King

Luke 19:28-40

This is it, there is no denying it now. We are much into the traditional Easter story instead of the Christmas one now. This is where things get less pretty, and more intense, full on and emotional…

Christmas is an exciting, fun time for myself and many others, full of great food, presents, laughter, joy and love. It’s easy to get distracted and forget the reason we are even celebrating is because a baby was born. Not just any baby though, the Son of God!

This passage in Luke 19 reminds us that not only should we be remembering and celebrating the moment Jesus was born, but also the moments after that in which He went into Jerusalem, got arrested and died on a cross, knowing that it was required in order that we might be able to live with Him in eternity.

Death and pain are not things we like to think about at this time of year, but this one was special. He didn’t stay dead, He rose from the dead later on, proving who He was and what He was born to do.

As Jesus enters Jerusalem, His followers shouted out, praising Him for what He had done, and even laying down their coats and leaves to make a path for Him (and the donkey He was on) to ride across. If you know the Easter story, you will know that these cries of Hosanna soon changed to be boos of hate.

It can be easy to love Jesus when things are going well and we are surrounded by happy people and good things but when things in life are challenging, Christmas is over and we go back into the ‘real’ world, are we still celebrating Jesus the King? Do we continue to worship Him when He is no longer a baby? Do we lift our voices or hands and give thanks to Him when the cross feels far too heavy for us and life isn’t all tinsel and bells and glitter?

I wonder how many of the people present on this day in Jerusalem, who seemed committed to worshipping and praising Jesus, continued supporting and loving Him when the crowds had to choose between Him and a murderer? How many of them still saw Him as their Lord and Saviour when He died on the cross? How and why would our God allow His Son to die a death like that? Surely it can’t really be Him!?

When Christmas is done, are you still going to be there beside Jesus when life is rough? Or are you only there for the good parts, the celebration? It’s a challenge for us all to make sure we don’t get life get in the way of recognising Jesus in everything and not giving up on Him when things don’t pan out the way we want.

Who will enter God’s Kingdom?

Who will enter God’s Kingdom?

Study of Luke 18:15-17

In yesterday’s passage, Jesus told the people that those who cause others to sin would be better off drowned due to the consequences. In this passage in Luke 18, we find Jesus telling the disciples not to reject or push away the children because the Kingdom belongs to people who are them.

  1. Why were the people bringing their babies to Jesus? Why did they want Him to touch them?
  2. Why do the disciples try to push the children away from God?
  3. What does it mean to ‘accept the Kingdom of God as a child’?
  4. In what way/s are children examples of how we should be? What traits is Jesus suggesting we lack?
  5. What is the lesson in this passage for us today?

When Jesus comes again

When Jesus comes again

Study of Luke 17:24-37

In this passage found in Luke 17, Jesus is telling His followers of what to expect when He comes back again. We know that they would not have experienced His second coming as we are yet to experience it, but we know that Jesus did not even know when this would be. He did know that we would be reading this though so perhaps it was intended more for those of us who read this in the Bible than for those who wrote it down in the first place.

  1. What signs are mentioned in the passage that will tell us Jesus is coming?
  2. Can you remember/ find another incidence that Jesus or God shone like lightening like He is depicted to do in His second coming?
  3. Why is this time also described like the events surrounding Noah and Lot?
  4. Verse 33 reads, ‘Those who try to keep their lives will lose them. But those who give up their lives will save them.’ What does this mean?
  5. When the people around who heard Jesus say all this they asked Him where it will happen. Jesus answered, “Where there is a dead body, there the vultures will gather.” What does He mean?
You will be rewarded

You will be rewarded

Study of Luke 14:12-14

In this passage, we find Jesus telling yet another parable to the man who He had attended dinner with. You will see when you read the whole chapter, that both the passage before and the one after are both parables and each of them are related to dinners and banquets also. He must have been hungry when He was telling these stories to have had food on brain each time!

  1. Why does Jesus talk use parables of eating and banquets so often in His teaching?
  2. Who was this teaching intended for?
  3. Why does Jesus tell the man to not only invite His rich friends and family but also the poor and crippled, lame and blind to the banquet?
  4. What does Jesus mean when He says, “But you will be repaid when the good people rise from the dead”?
  5. How can we use this parable to help us be more Christ-like in our lives?